1923        February 19 - March 2
9th British Industries Fair

White City, Shepherds Bush, London
 
P&GR 2.23 p358 (Fair preview):
AE Gray and Co Ltd, Glebe Works, Mayer Street, Hanley, Staffs. London agent: Mr WJ Stonier, 13 Charterhouse Street, EC1.
 
An interesting collection of new decorated china tea, breakfast and dessert services, on some new shapes, will be shown at the Fair. In dinner ware there will be also some good shapes, with enamel and hand-painted decorations; and a range of toilet and trinket sets, vases, plaques, bowls, and other ornamental and useful wares, including articles to meet the requirements of the mounting trade. Some of the small spray motifs of decoration, for example, [on biscuit barrels, with mounting], should find an easy market amongst good class dealers both in the home and Colonial market.
 
Apart from the free brushwork painted borders, sprays, and lines free of edge treatment, the makers are showing some individual litho patterns, and printed and enamel styles of decoration. In a reasonably-priced dinner service, we illustrate a new design, of border sprays with centre floral scheme, typical in some respects of the Old Bow hand-painted wares; also available on tea ware. The band work in conjunction with bright-coloured conventional spray, makes the ware of this firm stand out for its simplicity and clean effect.
 
An outstanding feature will be, however, the [Gloria lustre], wherein the firm have utilised in some measure the services of Mr Gordon Forsyth, whose work as a painter and designer of lustre ware won for him a deservedly high reputation. For this new lustre ware the services of trained hand-painting workers have been utilised to produce a lustre treatment for table wares, whereby very rich colours are obtained with the added interest of lustre, giving a jewel-like surface and effect in the pattern. In addition there will be seen some distinctive toilet and tea ware, in self-ground colours, produced by a special process, which are broken up into lustre effects. These wares are to be bought at very moderate prices. Associated with these lustre wares are a series of bowls, vases and toilet sets, etc, in novel effects of lustre treatment; whilst there are to be shown a series of decorative wall plaques, hand-painted in rich coloured lustres.
 
P&GR 3.23 p391 (Fair review):
AE Gray & Co Ltd, of Mayer Street, Hanley. Some tasteful hand-painted work was shown by this firm, and some new designs both in earthenware and china of tea, breakfast, dinner and toilet ware.
 
PG 4.23 p656 (Fair review):
AE Gray & Co Ltd, Glebe Works, Mayer Street, Hanley, whose stand was visited by the King and Queen, made a good display of useful tableware in tea, breakfast, and dinner sets, as well as coffees and saucers, and what are usually spoken of in the trade as 'fittings'. In the great bulk of the patterns simple freehand paintings were relied upon to yield the whole of the decoration.
 
It was clear that there was a set purpose in the designing of the whole of the patterns, viz, to provide the younger art students of the Potteries with an opportunity of expressing themselves by the use of the brush, unrestricted by the engraved outline which is so commonly resorted to. This simple freehand work is undoubtedly a coming form of decoration, and capable of wide development. It conforms to an ideal which has often been discussed of late years, and it is capable of yielding some very pleasing effects.
 
There were some neat and effective treatments also in hand-painted lustres, designed by Mr Gordon Forsyth, who was congratulated by the King on some of these. Queen Mary seemed particularly interested to hear that the girls who are now engaged in producing some of these hand-work patterns are drawn from the elementary schools and are being educated, through the medium of the local Potteries art schools, to do such creditable work. Some good toilet patterns were also shown by the house, one notable example being a service in a carmine colouring which ought to fit in harmoniously with some of the modern designs in fabrics. Throughout, in tea, breakfast, dinner, toilet, and sundries, the designs were certainly characterised by good taste.